IN THIS SECTION:
November 2012 Election
  

HOPE is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization committed to ensuring political and economic parity for Latinas through leadership, advocacy, and education to benefit all communities and the status of women. As the election approaches on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 we wanted to ensure that you had the ballot initiatives at your fingertips. This is a critical time for our nation, with the economy still facing a long road before full recovery. The Presidential election is of the upmost importance; equally as important are the initiatives that can shape the course California will take for the next few years.

 

Latinas comprise 6.9 million or 18% [i] of the total population and there are currently over 1.6 million registered to vote, as Latinas we have the numbers and power of making true change in our communities, but we need to VOTE!

 

Here are a few statistics for your information   

 

  • Latino students face overcrowded and under-funded schools, in the year 2011, 3,197,384 students were identified as Hispanic or Latino, comprising 51.4%[ii] of the total student population.
  • Latinos use Community Colleges as the gateway to higher education, there are currently 360,628 students enrolled in community colleges of those 81,365 (22.6%)[iii] are Latinos.    
  •  25%[iv] of Latino motorists are uninsured.
  • Of the 724 death row inmates, 169 or 23%[v] are Latinos.
  • Of all three strike offenders, 32.6%[vi] are Latinos.
  • Unemployment rate for California was 10.2%, Unemployment rate for Hispanics was 13.2% [vii] in September of 2012.

For your convenience we have created the voter guide below for you to take to the polls with you. Read the propositions and place your position in the space provided. HOPE encourages all voters to get out and vote on Nov. 6th. We challenge Latinas to vote and to mobilize at least 3 other people from their family and friends to do the same.

 

 

Below are some importance dates for you to remember:

October 30, 2012 – Last Day To Request Vote By Mail Ballot

November 6, 2012 – Election Day, Polls Open From 7am to 8pm

  If you would like a printer-friendly version of the information below, please click here.

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

30

Temporary Taxes to Fund Education:  Increases taxes on earnings over $250,000 for seven years and sales taxes by ¼ cent for four years, to fund schools. Guarantees public safety realignment funding. Fiscal Impact: Increased state tax revenues through 2018–19, averaging about $6 billion annually over the next few years (89% for K-12 and 11% for Community Colleges). Revenues available for funding state budget. In 2012–13, planned spending reductions, primarily to education programs, would not occur. Guarantees local governments receive tax revenues annually to fund program responsibilities transferred to them by the state in 2011.Sponsored by: Governor Jerry Brown.

A YES vote on this measure means: The state would increase personal income taxes on high-income taxpayers for seven years and sales taxes by one-quarter cent for every dollar for four years. The new tax revenues would be available to fund programs in the state budget. 

 

               Supporters

Yes on Prop 30

A NO vote on this measure means: The state would not increase personal income taxes or sales taxes. State spending reductions, primarily to education programs, would take effect in 2012–13. If rejected by voters, 2012–13 budget reduced by $6 billion. State revenues lower through 2018–19.
               
               Opponents

No on Prop 30

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

31

State Budget:  Establishes a two-year state budget. Sets rules for offsetting new expenditures, and Governor budget cuts in fiscal emergencies. Local governments can alter application of laws governing state-funded programs. Fiscal Impact: Decreased state sales tax revenues of $200 million annually, with corresponding increases of funding to local governments. Other, potentially more significant changes in state and local budgets, depending on future decisions by public officials. Sponsored by: California Forward Action Fund

 

 
*HOPE has taken a Support position on Proposition 31 due to its input in and involvement in the Government Reform process.

A YES vote on this measure means: Certain fiscal responsibilities of the Legislature and Governor, including state and local budgeting and oversight procedures, would change. Local governments that create plans to coordinate services would receive funding from the state and could develop their own procedures for administering state programs.

 

Supporters

Yes on Prop 31

A NO vote on this measure means: The fiscal responsibilities of the Legislature and Governor, including state and local budgeting and oversight procedures, would not change. Local governments would not be given (1) funding to implement new plans that coordinate services or (2) authority to develop their own procedures for administering state programs.

Opponents

No on Prop 31

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

32

Political Contributions By Payroll Deductions:  Prohibits unions from using payroll-deducted funds for political purposes. Applies same use prohibition to payroll deductions, if any, by corporations or government contractors. Prohibits union and corporate contributions to candidates and their committees. Prohibits government contractor contributions to elected officers or their committees. Fiscal Impact: Increased costs to state and local government, potentially exceeding $1 million annually, to implement and enforce the measure’s requirements. Sponsored by: The Lincoln Club

A YES vote on this measure means: Unions and corporations could not use money deducted from an employee’s paycheck for political purposes. Unions, corporations, and government contractors would be subject to additional campaign finance restrictions.




               Supporters

Yes on Prop 32

A NO vote on this measure means: There would be no change to existing laws regulating the ability of unions and corporations to use money deducted from an employee’s paycheck for political purposes. Unions, corporations, and government contractors would continue to be subject to existing campaign finance laws.

               Opponents

No on Prop 32

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

33

Auto Insurance Companies. Prices based On Driver’s History Of Insurance Coverage:  Changes current law to allow insurance companies to set prices based on whether the driver previously carried auto insurance with any insurance company. Allows proportional discount for drivers with some prior coverage. Allows increased cost for drivers without history of continuous coverage. Fiscal Impact: Probably no significant fiscal effect on state insurance premium tax revenues. Sponsored by: Mercury Insurance

A YES vote on this measure means: Insurance companies could offer new customers a discount on automobile insurance premiums based on the number of years in the previous five years that the customer was insured.

 

Supporters

Yes on Prop 33

A NO vote on this measure means: Insurers could continue to provide discounts to their long-term automobile insurance customers, but would continue to be prohibited from providing a discount to new customers switching from other insurers.

Opponents

No on Prop 33

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

34

Death Penalty:  Repeals death penalty and replaces it with life imprisonment without possibility of parole. Applies retroactively to existing death sentences. Directs $100 million to law enforcement agencies for investigations of homicide and rape cases. Fiscal Impact: Ongoing state and county criminal justice savings of about $130 million annually within a few years, which could vary by tens of millions of dollars. One-time state costs of $100 million for local law enforcement grants. Sponsored by: Jean Woodford

A YES vote on this measure means: No offenders could be sentenced to death under state law. Offenders who are currently under a sentence of death would be resentenced to life without the possibility of parole. The state would provide a total of $100 million in grants to local law enforcement agencies over the next four years.

 

Supporters

Yes on Prop 34

A NO vote on this measure means: Certain offenders convicted for murder could continue to be sentenced to death. The status of offenders currently under a sentence of death would not change. The state would not be required to provide local law enforcement agencies with additional grant funding.

 

Opponents

No on Prop 34

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

35

Human Trafficking:  Increases prison sentences and fines for human trafficking convictions (15 years to life and up to $1,500,000). Requires convicted human traffickers to register as sex offenders. Requires registered sex offenders to disclose Internet activities and identities. Fiscal Impact: Increased costs of a few million dollars annually to state and local governments for addressing human trafficking offenses. Potential increased annual fine revenue of a similar amount, dedicated primarily for human trafficking victims. Sponsored by: California Against Slavery and the Safer California Foundation

A YES vote on this measure means: Longer prison sentences and larger fines for committing human trafficking crimes. 





           
                 Supporters

Yes on Prop 35

A NO vote on this measure means: Existing criminal penalties for human trafficking would stay in effect.

   




               Opponents

No on Prop 35

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

36

Three Strikes Law:  Revises law to impose life sentence only when new felony conviction is serious or violent. May authorize re-sentencing if third strike conviction was not serious or violent. Fiscal Impact: Ongoing state correctional savings of around $70 million annually, with even greater savings (up to $90 million) over the next couple of decades. These savings could vary significantly depending on future state actions. Sponsored by: NAACP Legal Defense Fund and Stanford Law School

A YES vote on this measure means: Some criminal offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who commit certain non-serious, non-violent felonies would be sentenced to shorter terms in state prison. In addition, some offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who are currently serving life sentences for many non-serious, non-violent felony convictions could be resentenced to shorter prison terms. 

                
Supporters

Yes on Prop 36

A NO vote on this measure means: Offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who commit any new felony could continue to receive life sentences. In addition, offenders with two prior serious or violent felony convictions who are currently serving life sentences for non-serious, non-violent felonies would continue to serve the remainder of their life sentences.


            Opponents

No on Prop 36

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

37

Genetically Engineered Foods:  Requires labeling of food, sold to consumers made from plants or animals with genetic material, to be changed in specified ways. Prohibits marketing such food, or other processed food, as “natural.” Provides exemptions. Fiscal Impact: Increased annual state costs from a few hundred thousand dollars to over $1 million to regulate the labeling of genetically engineered foods. Additional, but likely not significant, governmental costs to address violations under the measure. Sponsored by: The Right to Know Campaign, written by James Wheaton

A YES vote on this measure means: Genetically engineered foods sold in California would have to be specifically labeled as being genetically engineered.

 

  

Supporters

 Yes on Prop 37

A NO vote on this measure means: Genetically engineered foods sold in California would continue not to have specific labeling requirements.

 

 

Opponents

No on Prop 37

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

38

Tax To Fund Education And Early Childhood Programs:  Increases taxes on earnings using sliding scale, for twelve years. Revenues go to K–12 schools and early childhood programs and for four years to repaying state debt. Fiscal Impact: Increased state personal income tax revenues for 12 years—roughly $10 billion annually in initial years, tending to grow over time. Funds used for schools, child care, and preschool, as well as providing savings on state debt payments. Sponsored by: Molly Munger

A YES vote on this measure means: State personal income tax rates would increase for 12 years. These funds would be used for schools, child care, preschool, and state debt payments.

 
               
Supporters

Yes on Prop 38

A NO vote on this measure means: State personal income tax rates would remain at their current levels. No additional funding would be available for schools, child care, preschool, and state debt payments.

            Opponents

No on Prop 38

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

39

Tax Treatment For Multistate Businesses.  Clean Energy and Energy Efficiency Funding:  Requires multistate businesses to pay income taxes based on percentage of their sales in California. Dedicates revenues for five years to clean/efficient energy projects. Fiscal Impact: Increased state revenues of $1 billion annually, with half of the revenues over the next five years spent on energy efficiency projects. Of the remaining revenues, a significant portion likely would be spent on schools. Sponsored by: Tom Steyer

A YES vote on this measure means: Multistate businesses would no longer be able to choose the method for determining their state taxable income that is most advantageous for them. Some multistate businesses would have to pay more corporate income taxes due to this change. About half of this increased tax revenue over the next five years would be used to support energy efficiency and alternative energy projects.

            
Supporters

Yes on Prop 39

A NO vote on this measure means: Most multistate businesses would continue to be able to choose one of two methods to determine their California taxable income.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prop.

Title and Description

A YES Vote

A NO Vote

Your VOTE

40

Redistricting. State Senate Districts:  A “Yes” vote approves and a “No” vote rejects, new State Senate districts drawn by the Citizens Redistricting Commission. If rejected, districts will be adjusted by officials supervised by the California Supreme Court. Fiscal Impact: Approving the referendum would have no fiscal impact on the state and local governments. Rejecting the referendum would result in a one-time cost of about $1 million to the state and counties. Sponsored by: Julie Vandermost

A YES vote on this measure means: The state Senate district boundaries certified by the Citizens Redistricting Commission would continue to be used.

  

Supporters

Yes on Prop 40

A NO vote on this measure means: The California Supreme Court would appoint special masters to determine new state Senate district boundaries.

 

               Opponents

No on Prop 40

 

   

_________________________

***Information obtained from the California Voter Information Guide***
[i]http://www.pewhispanic.org/files/states/pdf/CA_10.pdf
[ii]
http://www.ed-data.k12.ca.us/App_Resx/EdDataClassic/fsTwoPanel.aspx?#!bottom=/_layouts/EdDataClassic/profile.asp?Tab=1&level=04&reportnumber=16#studentsbyraceethnicity 
[iii]http://datamart.cccco.edu/Students/Enrollment_Status.aspx
[iv]
http://trpi.org/PDFs/insure.pdf
[v]
http://www.naacpldf.org/files/publications/DRUSA_Spring_2012.pdf
[vi]
http://www.justicepolicy.org/uploads/justicepolicy/documents/04-10_tac_caracialdivide_ac-rd.pdf
[vii]http://www.calmis.ca.gov/file/lfmonth/calmr.pdf

 

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